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Next Semester’s Jewish Studies and Hebrew Courses

Fall 2016

Introductory and Gen-Ed classes

JEWISH AND CHRISTIAN FOUNDATIONS  (J ST/CAMS/RL ST 004; GH; US; IL). 

TR: 12:05-1:20.  Instructor: John Betlyon.

Introduction to the perspectives, patterns of worship, morality, historical roots, and institutions of the Judaeo-Christian traditions & their relationship to culture.

JEWISH CIVILIZATION  (J ST 010; GH; IL).

Web.  Instructor:  Alan Benjamin.

An overview of Jewish identities across time and place: from ancient times to the present, in the Land of Israel and around the world.  Get a sense of the “big picture”!

JEWISH CIVILIZATION (J ST 010; GH; IL).

MWF: 11:15-12:05.  Instructor: Jacob Labendz.

What has it meant to live in the world as a Jew? This course provides an overview of the Jewish experience and of Jewish identities from ancient to modern times in locations around the world. Carefully selected “episodes” introduce students to the great variety of Jewish history and culture and provide them with a sense of literacy and the tools for further study. This is the course for beginners with big questions about Jews, Judaism, and Jewish history.

LANDS OF THE BIBLE  (J ST/CAMS/RL ST 012; GH; IL).

TR: 3:05-4:20.  Instructor: John Betlyon.

SOCIETY AND CULTURES IN MODERN ISRAEL  (J ST/ANTH/PL SC/SOC 060; GS; IL).

Web.  Instructor: Alan Benjamin.

This course will explore the people of the State of Israel (the nation-state established in 1948), their histories, numbers, migrations, institutions, norms, values, and the landscape in which they live.  We will explore collective identities, including those of the Arabs, Bedouin, Christians, Druze, Ethiopians, Israelis, Jews, Muslims, Russians, and Palestinians who are citizens of the State of Israel, as well as the social relations among them.

THE BIBLE AS LITERATURE  (J ST/ENGL 104; GH). 

TR: 9:05-10:20.  Instructor: Richard Doyle.

MYSTICISM AND KABBALAH  (J ST/RL ST 106; GH; IL).

TR: 9:05-10:20.  Instructor: David Ostrich.

Have you ever wondered what's all this you hear about Kabbalah and Jewish Mysticism? It sounds mysterious-- and there are those warnings about waiting until you're 40 and married...  Here's your chance to learn the way Kabbalah and mysticism work in religion, and how the mystical approach can deepen one's spiritual experiences.

HEBREW BIBLE: OLD TESTAMENT  (J ST/CAMS/RL ST 110; GH; US; IL).

MWF: 10:10-11:00.  Instructor: Aaron Rubin.

The Bible is a collection of stories, laws, and poetry by many different authors who lived two to three thousand years ago, and it still provides some of the most powerful images and ideas in Western culture. How did we get the Bible? How is the Christian Old Testament related to the Jewish Bible? In this course we will examine the writings of the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament in their historical context, analyze their meanings as literature, and consider their impact on religion and culture.

JESUS THE JEW  (J ST/CAMS/RL ST 112; GH; IL).

MWF: 12:20-1:10.  Instructor: Daniel Falk.

How did a marginal Jew from Galilee become one of the most famous and powerful people in history, inspiring what has become the largest religion in the world? Jesus is so important as the founder of Christianity that it is easy to forget that he was never a Christian himself—he was an observant Jew set on reforming Judaism. Recovering the Jewish Jesus is important not only for understanding the origins of Christianity, but also for fully understanding the richness of ancient Judaism. This course will delve into the historical evidence for Jesus and his world, and also reflect on the impact he made. 

MODERN JEWISH HISTORY  (J ST/HIST 118; US; IL).

TR: 10:35-11:50.  Instructor: Tobias Brinkmann.

This survey course assesses the Jewish experience in the last five hundred years, with a focus on Europe and North America. Jewish history after 1492 is a complex, yet fascinating story. A recurring theme concerns the relationship between individual Jews and Jewish communities, and on a broader level, the perception and treatment of Jews by societies and states.

NEW TESTAMENT  (J ST/CAMS/RL ST 120; GH). 

TR: 10:35-11:50.  Instructor: John Betlyon.

HISTORY OF THE HOLOCAUST 1933-1945  (J ST/HIST 121; GH; IL). 

MWF: 10:10-11:00.  Instructor: Jacob Labendz.

This course introduces with nuance and detail the history of the Holocaust, the murder of six-million civilians identifying or simply identified as Jews during the Second World War. Along with relating a chronology of events (beginning in the prewar period), the course seeks to familiarize students with some of the major themes in contemporary debates about the Holocaust, and with a wide range of regional and personal differences of experience. Individual narratives will pierce and challenge master narratives. This course stands on its own but also provides students with the necessary tools for further study.

HISTORY OF THE HOLOCAUST 1933-1945  (J ST/HIST 121; GH; IL).

TR: 9:05-10:20. Instructor: Eliyana Adler.

This course offers an historical introduction to the destruction of European Jewry in the middle of the last century. We will begin with life in pre-WWII Europe, study the rise of the Nazi party and ideology, and then turn to the unfolding of the genocide. Our study will seek to combine chronological development with the significant regional variety of experiences, and the historical sweep of the events with the personal experiences of individuals. 

APOCALYPSE AND BEYOND  (J ST/CAMS/RL ST 122; GH; IL).

MW: 2:30-3:45.  Instructor: Tawny Holm.

This course surveys apocalyptic literature and apocalyptic imagination about the end of the world, from its beginnings in the ancient Near East and the Bible to some examples from the modern world. Additional attention will be paid to the impact that apocalyptic worldviews have had on the secular world, especially in the fine arts and cinema.

EARLY AND MEDIEVAL CHRISTIANITY  (J ST/CAMS/RL ST 124; GH; US; IL).

MW: 4:00-5:15.  Instructor: Tawny Holm.

This course is an introduction to ancient Christianity and traces its development from the death of its founder (about the year 30 C.E.) to the beginning of the Middle Ages. It focuses on significant trends, major figures, turning points, and controversies, and covers a geographical area that stretches from the eastern end of the Roman Empire (the border with Persia) to northern Europe.

THE ISRAEL-PALESTINE CONFLICT  (J ST/HIST 140; GH; IL).

MWF: 9:05-9:55.  Instructor: Lior Sternfeld.

Why is the Israeli-Palestinian conflict so divisive? In this course we explore the origins of the conflict, the emergences of the Zionist and Palestinian national movements, the events leading to the establishment of Israel in 1948, and those following it. We will analyze changes brought in 1967 and the ensuing shifting Israeli and Palestinian stances. 

400-Level Classes

ANTISEMITISMS  (J ST/HIST/RL ST 409Y; IL). 

TR: 12:05-1:20.  Instructor: Eliyana Adler.

This course will trace the development of anti-Jewish hatred from the Ancient world to the present. As a seminar, it will provide in depth study of particular epochs and episodes, rather than a comprehensive introduction to each and every manifestation. In addition to learning about particular events, we will explore ways in which modern antisemitism grows out of Medieval roots and ways in which it radically differs from them.

BOOKS OF THE BIBLE: READINGS AND INTERPRETATION  (J ST/CAMS/RL ST 425W).

TR: 9:05-10:20.  Instructor: Kimberly Rubin.

JEWISH COMMUNITIES: IDENTITY, SURVIVAL, AND TRANSFORMATION IN UNEXPECTED PLACES  (J ST/ANTH/SOC 457; US; IL).

TR 1:35-2:50.  Instructor: Alan Benjamin.

Contemporary Jewish communities you may not have been aware existed.

THE CONTEMPORARY MIDDLE EAST  (J ST/HIST 473; IL).  

MWF: 11:15-12:05.  Instructor: Lior Sternfeld.

Instructor: Lior Sternfeld.

This course sets out to explore the elements that have come to constitute the modern “Middle East” as it has developed from late 18th century to the present. The geographical scope includes the territories of the Ottoman Empire, Iran, and North Africa. We will discuss the emergence of Imperialism, Colonialism, Nationalism, Secularism, Postcolonialism, Religious Modernism, and Fundamentalism. We will consider the place of the Ottoman Legacy and the Arab-Israeli Conflict in shaping the modern Middle East. Other themes will revolve around the significance of the oil economy, Iran, the "Arab Spring," and the so-called Islamic State.

Hebrew and Language Classes

BASIC MODERN HEBREW I  (HEBR 001).  

MTWR: 9:05-9:55.  Instructor: Ruth Edelstein.

INTERMEDIATE MODERN HEBREW  (HEBR 003). 

MTWR: 12:20-1:10.  Instructor: Ruth Edelstein.

INTRODUCTORY BIBLICAL HEBREW  (J ST/CAMS/HEBR 151).

MWF: 11:15-12:05.  Instructor: Aaron Rubin.

ADVANCED HEBREW – READING EMPHASIS  (HEBR 402).

MWF: 11:15-12:05.  Instructor: Ruth Edelstein.

SECOND SUMMER SESSION, 2016

JEWISH CIVILIZATION  (J ST 010; GH; IL).

Web.  Instructor: Alan Benjamin.

An overview of Jewish identities across time and place: from ancient times to the present, in the Land of Israel and around the world.  Get a sense of the “big picture”!

SOCIETY AND CULTURES IN MODERN ISRAEL  (J ST/ANTH/PL SC/SOC 060; GS; IL).

Web.  Instructor: Alan Benjamin.

This course will explore the people of the State of Israel (the nation-state established in 1948), their histories, numbers, migrations, institutions, norms, values, and the landscape in which they live.  We will explore collective identities, including those of the Arabs, Bedouin, Christians, Druze, Ethiopians, Israelis, Jews, Muslims, Russians, and Palestinians who are citizens of the State of Israel, as well as the social relations among them.


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