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Courses

Courses

Fall 2021 Jewish Studies Courses

JST 4 / RLST 4

Jewish and Christian Foundations

Instructor: David Ostrich
TIME: TuTh, 12:05PM – 1:20PM

It has been said that neither Judaism nor Christianity is a religion of the Bible (Old Testament). Christianity is the religion of the Old Testament as filtered through the lens of the New Testament. Similarly, Judaism is the religion of the Old Testament as filtered through the lens of the Talmud. You are invited to see the way the Bible, the Talmud, and the New Testament work with human religious concerns and produce the faiths which we know today.

JST 10

Jewish Civilization

Instructor: Eric Fleisch
TIME: TuTh, 1:35PM – 2:50PM

This course is an introduction to the study of the Jewish people, an ancient religious community that has lasted through the millennia. It will study the historical development of Jewish civilization, culture, and place in the world through a variety of case studies of Jewish civilizations living throughout varied regions of the world, at different times, and experiencing different challenges and opportunities unique to their moment in history. The main focus will be an exploration of how have Jewish leaders, communities, and individuals have reconciled their interests/agendas both as Jews and as members of a larger society with changing circumstances within and without their communities.

This course can also be used for completion of the Hebrew Minor.

JST / CAMS / RLST 12

Lands of the Bible from Adam and Eve to Muhammad

Instructor: Ann Killebrew
TIME: Web

Who, what, and where were the ancient peoples, cultures and places that played key roles in the shaping of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament), New Testament and Quran? When do they appear in history and how do we reconstruct their past and legacy? Why do these ancient cultures and writings continue to influence our contemporary world? Utilizing methodologies and approaches from historical geography, archaeology, contemporary historical documents, epigraphy and anthropology, we will investigate the civilizations and peoples of the lands associated with the biblical texts. This course examines the cultural traditions that developed in these regions and contextualize the world out of which the Bible emerged. Thousands of years later, their beliefs, customs and practices continue to resonate in our lives today.

This course can also be used for completion of the Hebrew Minor.

JST / SOC / ANTH / PLSC 060

Israeli Culture and Society

Instructor: Tamir Sorek
TIME: TuTh, 12:05PM – 1:20PM

The course introduces students to major themes in contemporary Israeli society. It investigates the implications of Israel’s origin as a settler-colonial enterprise on its social and political fabrics, focusing on the following: the tension between Israel’s definition as a Jewish state and liberal-democratic aspirations, the place of religion in defining national identity, the fragile status Palestinian citizens and non-citizens, intra-Jewish ethnic divides, and struggles over collective memory. In class discussions, students are encouraged to compare the dynamics in Israel/Palestine with the US context. Previous knowledge about the region is not required.

GER / JST 083

German Reactions to the Holocaust: From the Nazi Years to the Present

Instructor: Yaakov Kabalek
TIME: TuTh 12:05PM – 1:20PM

In many depictions of the Holocaust and the Second World War, Nazi Germany stands for absolute evil. Instead of exploring how and why “ordinary Germans” responded to the Holocaust, many ignore their motives or simply condemn non-Jewish Germans as a collective.  

This course offers a different perspective on the topic. In its first part, we will try to understand the varying reactions of the German populace to the reality around them during the Nazi years, beginning with those who were actively involved in the mass killing of Jews, to the bystanders and rescuers of Jews. What did they know and do? How did they experience the Holocaust? In the second part of the course, we will look at postwar attempts made by Germans (and Austrians) of different generations to work through this difficult past. How did they integrate the persecution and mass murder of the Jews into their personal and national history? What was the role of family stories, public debates, and cultural representations in shaping their attitudes toward this event?  

JST / RLST / CAMS 110

Hebrew Bible: Old Testament

Instructor: Aaron Rubin
TIME: MoWeFr, 10:10AM – 11:00AM

This course introduces the texts that make up the Hebrew Bible (also known as the Old Testament), along with the main literary and historical approaches that form the basis of modern biblical study. It is not assumed that you have any familiarity with the text of the Bible. Prior familiarity is certainly an asset, but as you will have ample opportunity to read the texts throughout the semester, it is not a necessity.

JST / RLST / CAMS 110

Hebrew Bible: Old Testament

Instructor: Kimberly Rubin
TIME: Web

This course introduces the texts that make up the Hebrew Bible (also known as the Old Testament), along with the main literary and historical approaches that form the basis of modern biblical study. It is not assumed that you have any familiarity with the text of the Bible. Prior familiarity is certainly an asset, but as you will have ample opportunity to read the texts throughout the semester, it is not a necessity.

JST 112 / CAMS 121 / RLST 121

Jesus the Jew

Instructor: Staff
TIME: MoWeFr, 1:25PM – 2:15PM

How did a Jewish peasant from an obscure village in Galilee, executed as a threat to Roman peace, come to be worshiped as God by a third of the population of the planet? How did his followers become a new religion that eventually persecuted the religion of their Lord? Jesus left no writings, and had only a small band of followers during his lifetime, yet he is one of the most influential humans to ever live. What can we know about Jesus the first-century Jew, behind the centuries of Christian theology? The course will consider the early evidence for Jesus, including the canonical as well as non-canonical gospels. We will ask how much the historian is able to reconstruct of Jesus using historical method, what the limits of this investigation are, and how relevant the task is. We will consider and evaluate the different scholarly reconstructions of the historical Jesus, and the impact of Jesus throughout history.

JST / CAMS / RLST 120

New Testament

Instructor: Staff
TIME: MoWeFr, 11:15AM – 12:05PM

Whether you are already familiar with the New Testament or simply curious about it, this course will provide you a thorough introduction to the books of the New Testament, central figures like Jesus and Paul, and the historical contexts that shed light on the early Christian movement.

JST / HIST 121

History of the Holocaust 1933-1945

Instructor: Tobias Brinkmann
TIME: TuTh 1:35PM – 2:50PM

This course provides an overview of the history of the Holocaust. First, we will discuss the meaning of terms such as Holocaust, Shoah, genocide, anti-Semitism and others. Why is research about the history of the Holocaust a relatively recent phenomenon?  In the main part of the course, we will look at the origins and the evolution of the “Final Solution.” Sessions will touch on Jewish life and death in the “Ghettos,” the role of the mobile killing units, the extermination camps, Jewish resistance, the role of the Allies, Holocaust trials, and the question how the Holocaust can be compared with other genocides.

JST / CAMS / RLST 124

Early and Medieval Christianity

Instructor: Staff
TIME: MoWeFr, 2:30PM – 3:45PM

How and why did Christianity become so influential in world history? This course traces the development of the Christian movement from its beginnings as a small Jewish sect in Jerusalem to its unlikely emergence as the religion of the Roman Empire and, finally, its subsequent spread and development in Europe, Asia, and Africa.

JST / GER / ENG / CMLIT 128N

The Holocaust in Film and Literature

Instructor: Yaakov Kabalek
TIME: TuTh, 3:05PM – 4:20PM

This class studies how literature, film, art, and other media can help us gain a perspective on one of the most horrific events in human history, the Holocaust: the genocidal murder of about six million men, women, and children defined as “racially” Jewish under the Nazi regime during World War II. Our main interest in class will be with the way people imagine (visualize in various ways) “how it was like” – both during and after World War II. We will also examine the theoretical questions involved in the various attempts to capture what appears to many as beyond comprehension, in terms of moral outrage and the sheer scale, inhumanity, and bureaucratic efficiency. To this end we will study well-known literary works, such as Primo Levi’s Survival in Auschwitz, films such as Steven Spielberg’s Schindler’s List, Roman Polanski’s The Pianist, and Roberto Benigni’s Life is Beautiful, as well as more obscure, older, and less internationally known works, in order to present diverse perspectives on the war and the Holocaust. We will also examine photographs, poems, installations, and other artifacts, and explore questions of memorialization (Holocaust museums and memorials), memory politics, and the ethics of historical representation. 

JST / HIST 140

The History of the Israel-Palestine Conflict

Instructor: Eric Fleisch
TIME: TuTh, 3:05PM – 4:20PM

The purpose of this course is to convey the complexity of the Israeli‑Palestinian conflict in all of its manifestations. We will study the core issues and narratives that have kept Israelis and Palestinians at loggerheads for more than a century. We will do this by tracing the historical progression of conflict and attempts at conflict resolution; We will explore the key underlying issues the keep the conflict alive; But most importantly, we will view material that expresses the perspective of all sides. Antagonists in conflicts often feel that their version of the history is authoritative. It is my intention in this course to introduce all perspectives, and provide students the tools and space to make any judgements (or not) on their own.

JST / HBR 151

Introductory Biblical Hebrew

Instructor: Aaron Rubin
TIME: MoWeFr, 9:05AM – 9:55AM

In this course we will learn the fundamentals of Biblical Hebrew, i.e., the language of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament). The course will emphasize grammar and focus on the ability to read—and, to a lesser degree, write—the language. No background in Hebrew is necessary to take this course.

JST / CAMS 153

Dead Sea Scrolls

Instructor: Daniel Falk
TIME: TuTh, 3:05PM - 4:20PM

The discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls in 1947 has been called the greatest archeological discovery of the 20th century. These scrolls include our oldest copies of biblical books, and hundreds of previously unknown Jewish writings from the 2nd century BCE to the 1st century CE. In this course we will investigate the contents of the Dead Sea Scrolls, and their significance for understanding Judaism, Jesus and Christianity. We will consider new texts, archeological discoveries and scholarly hypotheses.

JST / HIST / RLST 181

Introduction to the Middle East

Instructor: Janina Safran
TIME: MoWeFr, 12:20PM – 1:10PM

History/Jewish Studies 181, “Introduction to the Middle East,” provides a survey of the history of the Middle East between c. 600 and the present, with a weekly focus on two or three particular aspects of history, society, and culture. Lessons include regular textbook reading and analysis of primary sources such as architecture, poetry, literature, government documents, newspaper articles, and video clips. The course objectives are to stimulate interest in the varied historical experiences and diverse societies and cultures of the region, develop analytical skills and a basis for informed discussion of historical and current events, and provide a foundation for deeper investigation. Toward these ends, students learn important terms, concepts, contexts, individuals, and events, follow trends and patterns, locate specific events in meaningful context, interpret the historical significance of primary sources, and develop a long view of change and continuity.

JST 193 / HIST 193

Modern Iran

Instructor: Lior Sternfeld
TIME: MoWeFr, 10:10AM – 11:00AM

Ever since the beginning of the twentieth century, Iran has been in a constant state of revolution. Social, political, and economic factors generated numerous movements that strove to find a better mechanism by which to run the country. The Constitutional Revolution laid the foundations for a new political discourse of rights and duties, of representation, and sovereignty. Later, the abolishment of the Qajar dynasty and the establishment of the Pahlavi state endeavored to create a new society that would fly the flag of modernity through an imagined linkage to ancient Persian traditions. Policies and reforms of that era helped create a middle class, and served as a pretext to many of philosophical, ideological, and political debates about the nature of Iranian nationalism and the Iranian people, and the nations destiny in the world. And finally, the 1979 Revolution that aimed to create yet another “new” society but encountered difficulties to do so. The closure of this century was with the appearance of the reform movement that tried to revolutionize the country from within the apparatus of the Islamic Republic. This course will trace the social, political, and economic trends of Iranian history, through an examination of different schools of historiography, critical reading of scholarship and sources, and film analysis.

JST / CAMS / RLST 425W

Books of the Bible: Readings and Interpretation

Instructor: Staff
TIME: TuTh, 4:35PM - 5:50PM

Writing as a Jew at a time when the word “Christian” had not yet been coined, Paul the Apostle (1st c. CE) composed the earliest texts that came to be included in the Christian New Testament. This course is an intensive study of the life and writings of one of the founders of Christianity. What is the religious, political, and historical context in which Paul’s letters emerged? How were Paul’s letters received and interpreted by later Christians? While he was already a controversial figure in his lifetime, Paul the Apostle became even more controversial after his death. 

JST / COMM 434

Movies, Media, and the Jewish American Experience

Instructor: Lisa Sternlieb
TIME: We, 6:00PM – 9:00PM

The great Hollywood studios (MGM, Warners, Paramount, Universal, Columbia) were created by Jewish immigrants from Europe.  Desperate to assimilate, they created an idealized America on screen.   In this course we will consider how a group of Jewish immigrants created the American dream. We will study how Hollywood invented the ideal American family and how it depicted the Jewish experience in America.  We will learn how Jewish directors depicted the Holocaust.  And we will examine how Jewish screenwriters worked with and around the Production Code and the Blacklist.  Films will include works by Lubitsch, Wilder, Donen, Allen, Lumet, Spielberg, Kaufman, and the Coen brothers. Readings will include Neal Gabler’s An Empire of their Own: How the Jews Invented Hollywood, J. Hoberman’s An Army of Phantoms, Tim Cole’s Selling the Holocaust, and Peter Novick’s The Holocaust in American Life.

JST 450H

Genocide and Tyranny

Instructor: Zaryab Iqbal
TIME: MoWeFr, 9:05AM – 9:55AM

This course explores the concept of genocide from political, historical, and philosophical perspectives, focusing on the Holocaust as a critical case study. Explanations for the Holocaust are examined through an emphasis on epistemological issues — with discussions of specific topics such as the history of antisemitism, the typologies of genocide, and the uniqueness of the Holocaust.

JST 473 / HIST 473

The Contemporary Middle East

Instructor: Lior Sternfeld
TIME: Web

The goal of this course is to introduce students to the modern Middle East. What is it and how did it come into being? In answering these questions we will cover a broad range of themes, including the legacy of the Ottoman Empire, the oil economy, the Arab-Israeli conflict, and the Arab Spring. We will pay particular attention to several concepts and processes that are critical for understanding the modern Middle East. These include imperialism, colonialism, nationalism, secularism, postcolonialism, religious modernism, and fundamentalism. The chronological scope of the course is from the 18th century to the present, and the geographical scope stretches from Iran to North Africa. In pursuing the subjects of the course we will make use of primary sources, secondary literature, film, and music.

JST 478 / PHIL 478

Ethics After the Holocaust

Instructor: Nicholas De Warren
TIME: TuTh, 10:35AM – 11:50AM

The aim of this course is to explore various ways in which philosophers have responded philosophically to the ethical catastrophe of Auschwitz. Central to this exploration are the questions whether it remains possible to think about “the ethical” in traditional terms after Auschwitz; whether Auschwitz represents the manifestation of an evil that eludes historical conceptualizations of evil; to what extent the unforgivable is or is not forgivable; whether the historical truth of Auschwitz can be understood in terms of veridical narrative and first-person testimony; whether the evil of Auschwitz can be imagined, let alone represented; can God still speak to us, to his people as well as to humanity, after Auschwitz; and, finally, whether the singularity of Auschwitz resists proper naming (“Auschwitz,” “Holocaust,” “Shoah”) and/or comparison with other genocides. 

HEBR 1

Basic Modern Hebrew I

Instructor: Ruth Edelstein
TIME: MoTuWeTh, 9:05AM – 9:55AM

This course is an introduction to Basic Modern Hebrew Language. No prior knowledge is assumed. This course first acquaints students with the fundamental principles of the Hebrew language introducing learners to the Hebrew alphabet, reading, and writing skills. Students will be introduced to basic grammatical forms such as nouns, pronouns, adjectives, and basic verbs. Writing skills will be developed through homework and written assignments.

This course can also be used for completion of the Hebrew Minor.

HEBR 3

Intermediate Modern Hebrew

Instructor: Ruth Edelstein
TIME: MoTuWeTh, 12:20PM – 1:10PM

Intermediate Modern Hebrew is the third course in the sequence of Basic Modern Hebrew after Hebrew 01, and Hebrew 02. In this course, reading, writing and speaking skills are further developed. Acquisition of new vocabulary, and new grammatical forms will be exercised in class enabling students to improve their writing and speaking skills.  Comprehension and communicative competence in Hebrew are exercised by means of class discussions, oral presentations and Hebrew games.

This course can also be used for completion of the Hebrew Minor.

HEBR 402

Advanced Hebrew–Conversation Emphasis

Instructor: Ruth Edelstein
TIME: TuTh, 1:35PM – 2:50PM

This Advanced level of Hebrew is a continuation of Hebrew 401 and provides students who have already acquired fundamental Hebrew language skills the opportunity to strengthen and exercise the language through a variety of activities. We will analyze poetry, read short stories in Hebrew that reflect cultural material, and discuss current events. The course will also provide students with the opportunity to practice reading comprehension and writing.

This course can also be used for completion of the Hebrew Minor.

CAMS 400W

Gender and Sexuality in the Bible (Comparative Study of the Ancient Mediterranean World)

Instructor: Tawny Holm
TIME: MonWed, 4:00PM – 5:15 pm

This writing intensive course will examine issues of gender and sexuality in the Bible, including both the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament and the New Testament. It will introduce students to a variety of academic approaches to the Bible with respect to a broad range of topics, such as: gender identity, sexual orientation, sex, marriage, adultery, monogamy and polygyny, same-sex relations, divorce, prostitution, gender violence, pornography, procreation, abortion, and many others. Alongside a close reading of the text (philology), this course will employ historical and literary criticism, interpretations of ancient material culture (archaeology), modern theoretical interpretive approaches, reception theory, and other methodologies to examine not only the biblical writings in their ancient contexts, but their interpretation and use throughout history to construct social norms.

(Related course. No JST credit)

Fall 2021 Hebrew Courses

HEBR 151

Introduction to Biblical Hebrew

Instructor: Aaron Rubin
TIME: MoWeFr, 9:05AM – 9:55AM

Fundamentals of Biblical Hebrew grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. J ST (CAMS/HEBR) 151 Introductory Biblical Hebrew (3) The aim of CAMS/J ST/HEBR 151 is to introduce students to the fundamentals of Biblical Hebrew as quickly and thoroughly as possible. Biblical Hebrew is the language in which the Old Testament was written, between the period of approximately 1200-200 B.C.E. This focuses primarily on the morphology and syntax of Biblical Hebrew. Drills on each point of grammar, as well as translation of sentences from Hebrew to English and English to Hebrew, and brief passages taken from the Bible are the basis of the student’s homework throughout the semester. By the end of the semester, the students will be prepared to read short, unmodified passages of the Bible. The course will focus primarily on reading and writing, though students will read aloud in class regularly in order to ensure correct pronunciation and understanding. CAMS/J ST/HEBR 151 will prepare students to continue with CAMS/J ST/HEBR 152 and then 400-level courses.The course goals, in addition to providing the students with a firm grounding in Hebrew grammar and vocabulary, include giving the students a basic understanding of the history of the Biblical text. The primary focus will be on mastering paradigms and syntax, but the students will also be introduced to the Biblical texts themselves, which together from such an important piece of literature.

HEBR 152

Intermediate Biblical Hebrew

Instructor: N/A
TIME: Not Running this Fall

Intermediate study of Biblical Hebrew grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. CAMS (JST/HEBR) 152 Intermediate Biblical Hebrew (3)(BA) This course meets the Bachelor of Arts degree requirements. CAMS/JST/HEBR 152 continues from CAMS/J ST/HEBR 151, which is a prerequisite for enrollment. After a brief review of key grammar and morphology from the first semester, the course will complete the process of providing students with a sufficient grasp of Hebrew vocabulary, morphology, and syntax to enable them to read unadapted passages from Biblical Hebrew texts (with the aid of a lexicon) by the end of the course. Class sessions will focus on grammar drills, sentences, and similar exercises as homework to supplement class work. As the semester progresses, students will read more and more from actual Hebrew texts, rather than composed sentences by the textbook author, so that when the students enter more advanced classes, they will find the transition to reading Hebrew as smooth as possible.In tandem with the increasing emphasis on Hebrew written by ancient Hebrews, the course will continue to focus on the linguistic and cultural background for the texts that the students read. Students will be evaluated on a combination of written work, including frequent quizzes, tests, homework completion, and course attendance and participation. CAMS/J ST/HEBR 152 will prepare students to continue with courses at the 400-level.

HEBR 402

Advanced Hebrew, Reading Emphasis

Instructor: Ruth Edelstein
TIME: TuTh, 1:35PM – 2:50PM

Readings in representative works of traditional and modern literature; practice in composition; study of aspects of Jewish culture.

Fall 2021 Holocaust and Genocide Studies Courses

JST/GER 83

German Reactions to the Holocaust: From the Nazi Years to the Present

Instructor: Yaakov Kabalek
TIME: TuTh, 12:05pm-1:20pm

In many depictions of the Holocaust and the Second World War, Nazi Germany stands for absolute evil. Instead of exploring how and why “ordinary Germans” responded to the Holocaust, many ignore their motives or simply condemn non-Jewish Germans as a collective.  

This course offers a different perspective on the topic. In its first part, we will try to understand the varying reactions of the German populace to the reality around them during the Nazi years, beginning with those who were actively involved in the mass killing of Jews, to the bystanders and rescuers of Jews. What did they know and do? How did they experience the Holocaust? In the second part of the course, we will look at postwar attempts made by Germans (and Austrians) of different generations to work through this difficult past. How did they integrate the persecution and mass murder of the Jews into their personal and national history? What was the role of family stories, public debates, and cultural representations in shaping their attitudes toward this event?  

JST/HIST 121

History of the Holocaust 1933-1945

Instructor: Tobias Brinkmann
TIME: TuTh, 1:35pm-2:50pm.

This course focuses on the history and historiography of the Holocaust from 1933-1945. In addition to cultivating intellectual skills, such as critical analysis and concise presentation, the primary purpose of this course is to provide an in-depth overview of the Holocaust. The course will touch on various aspects of the Holocaust, including the function of the “Ghettos”, the role of the mobile killing units, extermination camps, Jewish resistance, the role of the Allies, Holocaust trials, and the question how the Holocaust can be compared with other genocides. The course will analyze the Holocaust using historical, literary, and philosophical approaches.

GER/RUS 143

The Culture of Stalinism and Nazism

Instructor: Adrian Wanner
TIME: TuTh, 1:35pm-2:50pm

This course, which is cross-listed between Russian and German, aims to acquaint students with an important and troubling chapter of 20th-century culture. The regimes of Stalin and Hitler have had a decisive impact not only on life in Russia and Germany, but in much of Europe and the world at large. There is no consensus among scholars about how to classify these systems, whether the term “totalitarian” is appropriate to describe them, and whether Stalinist Russia and Nazi Germany are essentially similar or essentially different historical phenomena. Espousing a comparative perspective, this course explores the culture produced by Stalinist Russia and Nazi Germany, taking into account both the culture of daily life and selected works of “high culture,” including literature, the visual arts, architecture, music, and film. The ideological underpinnings of both systems will be discussed and compared. The classics of Stalinist Socialist Realism and Nazi propaganda will be analyzed both as political statements and works of art. The course will also include a reading of authors who attempted to create critical representations of life in Stalinist and Nazi societies, such as Lydia Chukovskaya, Varlam Shalamov, Primo Levi, and George Orwell. The course is designed to be suitable for all students generally interested in Russian and/or German culture, or interested in various fields of humanistic study, whether or not they have previously studied the culture of Russia or Germany. A knowledge of Russian or German is not required, as class lectures and discussions as well as all reading assignments will be in English. This course is designed to count as General Education, as a GH “Humanities,” and as an IL “International Cultures” course. It meets the BA requirements in the humanities by asking students to demonstrate competence in 20th-century German and Russian history, political philosophy, literature, art and film.

JST / GER / ENG / CMLIT 128N

The Holocaust in Film and Literature

Instructor: Yaakov Kabalek
TIME: TuTh, 3:05PM – 4:20PM

This class studies how art, literature, film, and other media can help us to gain a perspective on one of the most horrific events in human history, the Holocaust: the genocidal murder of more than six million men, women, and children (mostly Jewish) under the Nazi regime during World War II. We will also examine the theoretical questions involved in any attempt to capture what appears to be beyond our comprehension, in terms of moral outrage and the sheer scale, inhumanity, and bureaucratic efficiency. To this end we will study literary works, such as Primo Levi’s Survival in Auschwitz, films such as Steven Spielberg’s Schindler’s List, Roman Polanski’s The Pianist, and Roberto Benigni’s Life is Beautiful, as well as photographs, poems, artworks, installations, museum architecture, the design of monuments and other artifacts. We will also examine questions of memorialization (Holocaust museums and memorials), national guilt, survivor’s guilt, stigmatization, and the ethics of historical representation.

AFR/PLSC 443

Ethnic Conflict in Africa

Instructor: Kidane Mengisteab
TIME: TuTh, 9:05am-10:20am

This course explores the various causes and impacts of ethnic conflicts in the African context.

GER / JST 083

German Reactions to the Holocaust: From the Nazi Years to the Present

Instructor: Yaakov Kabalek
TIME: TuTh 12:05PM – 1:20PM

In many depictions of the Holocaust and the Second World War, Nazi Germany stands for absolute evil. Instead of exploring how and why “ordinary Germans” responded to the Holocaust, many ignore their motives or simply condemn non-Jewish Germans as a collective.  

This course offers a different perspective on the topic. In its first part, we will try to understand the varying reactions of the German populace to the reality around them during the Nazi years, beginning with those who were actively involved in the mass killing of Jews, to the bystanders and rescuers of Jews. What did they know and do? How did they experience the Holocaust? In the second part of the course, we will look at postwar attempts made by Germans (and Austrians) of different generations to work through this difficult past. How did they integrate the persecution and mass murder of the Jews into their personal and national history? What was the role of family stories, public debates, and cultural representations in shaping their attitudes toward this event?  

JST / PLSC 450H

Genocide and Tyranny

Instructor: Zaryab Iqbal
TIME: MoWeFr, 9:05am - 9:55pm

This course focuses on the conceptualization and socio-political determinants of genocide and tyrannical regimes, with an emphasis on the Holocaust.

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